If you trust in yourself... and believe in your dreams... and follow your star... you’ll still get beaten by people who spent their time working hard and learning things and weren't so lazy.Terry Pratchett

Classroom culture in Cambodia

April 9, 2015

For me, the hardest part of my job is sitting behind a desk – I much prefer to be out in the villages conducting financial education with people from the community, or coaching one of the other trainers. I spend a lot of time on the road and my recent visit to Kampong Speu to see the last lesson of the ‘Learning for a Better Life’ training program in one of the villages was a particular highlight.

The participants were women of all ages, from young mums to grandmas, and there were many children playing energetically in the yard. The women sat together and talked about what they had learned throughout the course and how they would use their knowledge to plan for the future.

This is my colleague Horl Taysreng delivering a financial education class to women in Kampong Speu

This is my colleague Horl Taysreng delivering a financial education class to women in Kampong Speu

Laughter and smiles were everywhere as the TPC trainer, Horl Taysreng, delivered his content with many questions and jokes. In Cambodian culture, we love to laugh together and using humour is a great way to enthuse and motivate people during training.

We conducted a survey of participants to find out more about their experiences of the financial education course. Many of the responses we received back are very encouraging. Some of the topics that participants said they particularly enjoyed and found useful include: learning about reducing household expenses; learning about how to save for emergency events; making a savings plan; and creating a dream board that shows goals for the future.

When I got up at the end of the class to greet the students and ask them what their dreams for the future were, many said they would like to build a sturdier house or help their children go to university. For many people living in rural Cambodia, these are simple but common goals.

Many participants bring their children and grandchildren along.

Many participants bring their children and grandchildren along.

Seangdy Hy
Seangdy is based in Cambodia and is Good Return's Village Trainer. Read more by Seangdy Hy

Categories: Cambodia, Skills Development, Village Trainers
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