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Make a Loan

Make a Loan

Make a loan by selecting one of the people below. Your loan will not only help a family invest in the future but also provide them access to responsible microfinance and skills development opportunities.
community lending
Loans made through Good Return have an exceptional repayment rate and so at the end of the loan period, your money will be returned. Because your loan is converted into local currency there may be a small exchange rate loss or gain. Good Return takes an additional 10% administration fee to help fund our ongoing programs.
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At the end of the loan period, you may choose to donate the funds. If you do,  your money will be used to enrich the community in which your borrower lives.


Our Borrowers

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Sim ONN

Cambodia

A bountiful harvest requires a farm to be well fertilised and irrigated before planting. Sim has three children with her construction worker husband. So to assure a good yield, it’s essential their crops get the best start possible. Sim (38) seeks a loan to buy fertiliser that will deliver a solid result in a few months’ time. She believes that with these seasonal inputs, she will have a good harvest that will maintain the family’s subsistence living.

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Nelly Oliverio

Philippines

Nelly helps her husband support their family by running a variety store in their village. As family funds have been tight, she has had to use some of the store’s takings to pay household expenses. Now her inventory is running low and she cannot afford to restock. Nelly (41) needs a loan to refill her shelves. As sales recover, she will use the profit to sustain her children’s education and ensure a bright future for them.

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Lineni Tafolo

Tonga

Lilieni Tafolo seeks a loan to help grow her sewing business. At 56, she lives with her husband and some of their children and grandchildren. She has been able to apply her seamstress skills and generate some extra income for her family. Lilieni will use her loan to buy more fabric, threads and garment accessories to boost her workshop’s output. She hopes this will assure a brighter future for her grandchildren.

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Taungalu Pahia

Tonga

Taungalu Pahia and her husband work hard, but they know the yield from their peanut farm could be improved with better inputs and management. It’s the beginning of another season and she seeks a loan to buy more seeds, fertilisers and insecticides, and to hire labour for planting. By making her farm more productive, Taungalu knows a good harvest in a few months’ time will provide financial stability for the family.

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Ma. Maribe Aron

Philippines

As sole provider, Ma. Maribe (46) hawks fish to support her four children. Despite their hardship, she insists her children continue their studies, believing it the best legacy she can provide. Dried fish is a popular food in the Philippines – it is a cheap and tasty source of protein. Ma. Maribe seeks a loan to buy more fish, and what she cannot move each day she will dry and sell later. This dedicated mother believes her fish hawking trade can assure a good start in life for all her family.

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Marina Morales

Philippines

Hawking fish in her village provides Marina with a reliable but meagre income. Marina wants to boost her trade but lacks the capital to buy larger quantities of fish. With a wider variety of stock in her baskets each morning, including smoked and salted fish, Marina can supply more customers. She is determined this loan can improve her business, and allow her to save for lean times.

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