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Our Borrowers

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Susana Vaea

Tonga

Susana (51) lives with six of her nine children. She grows vegetables to supplement her family’s income from their taxi business. As another planting season approaches, Susana asks for a loan to buy high quality seeds. She is confident this will ensure a good harvest – which will in turn generate more income to improve her family’s standard of living, and their chance of a better future.

Lend

Melesungu Hakalo

Tonga

Tapa is a paper-like cloth made from the bark of a mulberry tree which is pound into a fibrous pulp, dried and hand-painted by Tongan women. Melesungu (62) has four children. She lives with her husband, two of her own children and two grandkids. Her husband is a farmer but his wage barely meets all their needs. Melesungu plans to run a tapa-making business to supplement her husband’s income. She will use her loan to buy the raw materials she needs to start her business and hopes the extra income will help cover the costs of her grandchildren’s education.

Lend

Liliokalani Finau

Tonga

Liliokalani (34 years old) has three children. She supplements her husband’s farming income by making tapa. This is the traditional Tongan cloth made from the inner bark of the paper-mulberry tree. It is sun-dried then soaked, before being beaten into the thin pulp that becomes the finished fabric. Liliokalani could increase her output if she had the capital to buy more raw materials. She will use her loan to do this, and hopes to generate enough cash to ensure her children receive the care and education they need.

Lend

Kalisi Kolo

Tonga

A single mother of two young children, Kalisi is not afraid of hard work. At 36 years of age, she loves to bake cakes, cookies and pastries for her catering business. Her positive attitude means she is keen to expand, even though this will mean long days in a hot kitchen. She seeks a loan to buy ingredients, trays and a new stove to boost her output of bakery snacks. The extra income will help sustain her family.

Lend

Kaloni Holi

Tonga

Kaloni has seven children – one in primary and four in secondary school. Her two youngest two are not yet ready for school. She and her husband work together to support the family by growing vegetables, such as taro and sweet potato. Kaloni will use her loan to buy gardening tools, pesticides and fertilisers to guarantee a good yield from their crops. This means more income, and she will use this to improve her house and support her children’s education.

Lend

Mele Veikoso

Tonga

With six children to feed, Mele (32 years old) supplements her carpenter husband’s income by making handicrafts. Mele could increase her output if she had the capital to buy more raw materials, such as hibiscus and pandanus leaves. She will use her loan to do this, and hopes to generate enough cash to help improve their children’s living conditions.

Lend