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change a life

  1. 1.Lend
  2. 2.Get Repaid
  3. 3.Reinvest
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Our Borrowers

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Oun PHOEU

Cambodia

Oun and her husband grow rice on their farm paddy, but its $10 a day income is only enough to cover basic household expense. With no savings, Oun (40) seeks a loan to buy a motorbike. Looking ahead, she would like to add more land to their plot, and will save to achieve this goal.

Lend

Lan ENG

Cambodia

Although they continue to grow rice, Lan Eng (36) also sells corn in her village. She has had to divert some cashflow to balance the household budget, and this has forced her to run down her stock levels. She will use this loan to buy more corn to sell. The extra working capital should quickly restore sales, and Lan expects this will help give her family a better quality of life.

Lend

Rosario Lebuna

Philippines

Rosario’s family home is only about five years old, but it is built of light materials and needs urgent repairs. With the unpredictable monsoonal weather, Rosario (31) wants to secure her family’s safety as soon as possible. She seeks a loan for the building materials and tools her husband needs to fix their house. This assistance will ensure her family can remain happy and healthy in their weatherproofed home.

Lend

'Uheina Pale

Tonga

‘Uheina Pale is talented at making traditional mats and other handicrafts. At 34 and with one child, she is seeking a loan to maintain her business by buying pandanus leaves and other raw materials for her craftwork. She hopes to increase her takings by $15 a day. Uheina knows that the additional income will help her family in times of financial need and support the education of her child.

Lend

Malama Palanite

Tonga

Malama Palanite is an enterprising woman. She prepares ready-to-eat meals at home, then packs and delivers them to local offices and other workplaces. A loan will enable her to buy extra ingredients to expand this catering venture and its income. At 24, Malama’s priority is to improve her housing conditions. A successful snack and meal service will ensure she can do this.

Lend

Mele Hopoi

Tonga

Mele Hopoi has chosen to make tapa to help her family’s livelihood. This paper-like cloth is made from the bark of a mulberry tree, which is pulped and dried, then hand-painted by Tongan women. It is given as gifts at weddings and funerals, or used for clothing, blankets and costumes. Mele is seeking a loan so she can purchase the raw materials (feta’aki) to make more tapa.

Lend