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change a life

  1. 1.Lend
  2. 2.Get Repaid
  3. 3.Reinvest
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Our Borrowers

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SECDEP 14

Philippines

As a result of the generosity of supporters, there is a shortage of individual loan applications. Until we receive new personal stories, you may choose to lend to SECDEP, our microfinance partner on Panay island in the Philippines. SECDEP grants credit to poor women, usually in rural districts, enabling them to run a small enterprise as a way to escape poverty. Without its microfinance services, many have no access to capital to build a business.
A loan to SECDEP will provide fresh funds that it will advance to members seeking finance for their small farms and businesses. Good Return also works with SECDEP to deliver education in basic and financial literacy, and earning a livelihood. Your microfinance support leverages these skills, together assuring long term, sustainable returns.

Lend

SPBD Fiji 16

Fiji

Rusila is one of many Fijian women helped by Good Return. Thanks to the generosity of you and other supporters, we have temporarily run out of individuals whom we can put forward for your help. We are working with our associates to present more of their clients. But until we can share their personal stories, we offer this alternative of lending directly to our partner in Fiji. By supporting SPBD, you are helping women like Rusila break the cycle of poverty for themselves and their families.

Lend

Lav IN

Cambodia

54 year old widow Lav In works at weddings and similar functions, using her $3 a day wage to provide for her grandchild. To augment her savings, Lav seeks a loan to buy a piece of land next to her house. Lav plans to cultivate some fruit and vegetable on this plot, and hopes the extra income will improve the family’s living standards.

Lend

Riza Escanlar

Philippines

Charcoal is a basic need for all rural families. Riza (30) retails sacks of this essential cooking fuel, and earns $5 a day from this. Her husband is a farmer. To expand her business, Riza plans to start selling rice, and believes this will yield another $8 a day. With school age children, she and her husband hope the extra income will help cover their fees and other school costs.

Lend

Noeun KHEANG

Cambodia

To support a family of three, Noeun (46) depends on her grocery store and ginger farm. As she has had to divert cash to planting another ginger crop, she has run down inventory. Noeun knows that more stock will ensure more sales, so seeks a loan to refill her empty shelves. With all the normal pantry lines in place, she expects sales to recover. Noeun will use the extra takings to improve their house and living conditions, and cover her children’s education costs.

Lend

Lelita Roque

Philippines

As the operator of a general store, Lelita knows she needs to maintain a good mix of goods to sell. But she has run down her stock and it’s now time to refill the shelves. So she has requested a loan to buy replacement supplies. The new lines will immediately boost sales, and higher turnover and profit will increase her income. Although she makes only a dollar or two a day from her store, it means she can meet the school costs of her children.

Lend