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  1. 1.Lend
  2. 2.Get Repaid
  3. 3.Reinvest
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Our Borrowers

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'Amelia Takitaki

Tonga

‘Amelia Takitaki runs a variety store and turns over $80 a day for her efforts. There are many such outlets in Tonga, where goods can be bought in affordable small quantities, often on credit. ‘Amelia needs a loan to buy more inventory, especially meat and telephone cards, both of which are popular items. This will boost takings to $90 a day, making her more confident of meeting her family’s needs.

Lend

Ing UON

Cambodia

Ing (64) and her husband grow sugar cane. To improve their home, Ing has applied for a special purpose sanitation loan to repair and extend its toilet facilities. This investment will safeguard the health of the family, which for now is his top priority.

Lend

Lineti Talakai

Tonga

Like many Pacific islanders,Lineti Talakai (52) has traditional weaving skills. She wants to exploit her expertise to earn money and help support her four children. Her husband’s wage as an accounts clerk doesn’t fully cover the family daily needs. Lineti has applied for a loan to buy more yarn and other materials, to increase her output and the income she can make. She is confident that by expanding her production, she will be able to boost sales. Lineti hopes that higher income will help improve their children’s education and living conditions.

Lend

Penh SOY

Cambodia

Penh (36) is a tailor and earns about $3 per day. Household expenses absorb it all, and there is nothing left for other needs. She wants to build a kitchenette at the back of her house. Penh will use her loan to cover these expenses and hopefully save to improve her living conditions.

Lend

Percy Actoy

Philippines

To make ends meet, Percy sees pigs as a solution: they are cheap to buy and maintain, so represent a smaller risk than other animals. They multiply fast, survive on household and farm scraps, and can be sold for ready cash. Percy seeks a loan to buy her first batch of weaners. She says she will rear them with care and sell them after eight or nine months. Percy hopes this income will help ensure the wellbeing of her family.

Lend

Josephine Moraga

Philippines

Josephine (55) has built her own business selling cosmetics and beauty products. She makes $8 a day, which helps support her child’s education. Josephine wants a loan to extend the range of cosmetics that she hawks to her local clientele. By increasing inventory, she knows she will generate extra sales and income for her family.

Lend